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Health Rankings — Pinellas County and Hillsborough County

April 6, 2016 Leave a comment

The following infographic from the Suncoast Health Council compares various health factors between Pinellas and Hillsborough Counties, Florida:

 

2016 Pinellas-Hillsborugh Health Rankings

 

Last Week’s Big Healthcare Law Stories

May 30, 2015 Leave a comment

As healthcare providers and their lawyers know, things happen fast in healthcare.  Business deals, enforcement activity, new inventions and discoveries.

Here are a few headlines from last week in no particular order:

  • OIG Mid-Year 2015 Work Plan Mid-Year Update — The OIG published its 86 page mid-year update to its 2015 Work Plan. “This edition of the Work Plan, effective as of May 2015, describes OIG audits, evaluations, and certain legal and investigative initiatives that are ongoing. In response to adjustments made to our Work Plan, this mid-year update removes items that have been completed, postponed, or canceled and includes new items that have been started since October 2014. The word “new” before a project title indicates that the project did not appear in the previous Work Plan. For each project, we include the subject, primary objective, and criteria related to the topic. At the end of each description, we provide the internal identification code for the review (if a number has been assigned) and the year in which we expect one or more reports to be issued as a result of the review. This edition also forecasts areas for which OIG anticipates planning and/or beginning work in the upcoming fiscal year and beyond. Typically, these broader areas of focus are based on the results of OIG’s risk assessments and have been identified as significant management and performance challenges facing HHS. In FY 2015 and beyond, we will continue to focus on emerging payment, eligibility, management, and information technology systems security vulnerabilities in health care reform programs, such as the health insurance marketplaces. OIG plans to add to its portfolio of work on care quality and access in Medicare and Medicaid, as well as on public health and human services programs. OIG’s examination of the appropriateness of Medicare and Medicaid payments will continue, with possible additional work on the efficiency and effectiveness of payment policies and practices in inpatient and outpatient settings, for prescription drugs, and in managed care. Other areas under consideration for new work include, for example, the integrity of the food, drug, and medical device supply chains; the security of electronic data; the use and exchange of health information technology; and emergency preparedness and response efforts.”
  • CMS Proposes New Rule for Medicaid Managed Care — “This proposed rule would modernize the Medicaid managed care regulations to reflect changes in the usage of managed care delivery systems. The proposed rule would align the rules governing Medicaid managed care with those of other major sources of coverage, including coverage through Qualified Health Plans and Medicare Advantage plans; implement statutory provisions; strengthen actuarial soundness payment provisions to promote the accountability of Medicaid managed care program rates; and promote the quality of care and strengthen efforts to reform delivery systems that serve Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries. It would also ensure appropriate beneficiary protections and enhance policies related to program integrity. This proposed rule would also require states to establish comprehensive quality strategies for their Medicaid and CHIP programs regardless of how services are provided to beneficiaries. This proposed rule would also implement provisions of the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) and addresses third party liability for trauma codes.”
  • Florida Senate Tweaks Health Exchange Plan For Fast Action — “The new Senate plan would jettison an initial proposal to expand Medicaid this summer, but instead would still rely on federal money linked to President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. Low-income Floridians would be eligible to purchase coverage through a new state-run exchange, but they would have to pay premiums and they would be required to work. The new health coverage plan would require federal approval and would not kick in until January.  It would also allow consumers who are currently getting insurance through the federal exchange to continue doing so instead being bumped to an expanded Medicaid program — something the House criticized in the initial proposal.”
  • New York Assembly Passes Universal Health Care Bill — The New York Assembly passed the New York Health Act, which is seen largely as a symbolic gesture and not likely to be passed by the Republican New York Senate.  The bill’s Economic Analysis stated “This report analyzes the economic effects of the New York Health Act …, which would establish a comprehensive, universal health insurance program for all New Yorkers. The Act would replace the current multi-payer system of employer-based insurance, individually acquired insurance, and federally sponsored programs (e.g., Medicare and Medicaid) with a single billing pipeline funded by broad-based progressively graduated assessments collected by the State and based on income and ability to pay, thereby reducing administrative bloat and monopolistic pricing and dramatically reducing the cost of health care to New Yorkers even while extending and improving the provision of care.”
  • 21st Century Cures Act: A Call to Action — “The House Energy and Commerce Committee recently approved the 21st Century Cures Act with a vote of 51-0. The nonpartisan legislation will help to modernize and personalize health care, encourage greater innovation, support research, and streamline the system to deliver better, faster cures to more patients.”
  • FTC Commissioner Calls For War On Hospital Construction Laws — Law360 reported yesterday that “Federal Trade Commissioner Maureen K. Ohlhausen on Friday urged the antitrust agency to put pressure on state legislatures around the country to scrap laws requiring state approval for the construction of new hospitals, saying the laws are ‘anti-competitive’ in nature and create barriers for new market entrants.”
  • Two Cardiologists To Pay Over $3.6 Million For Fraud — “Jasjit Walia and Preet Randhawa and their New Jersey-based cardiology practice Garden State Cardiovascular Specialists will pay the amount to resolve allegations that they submitted claims to federal insurance program Medicare for various cardiology diagnostic tests and procedures. The tests included stress tests, cardiac catheterizations and external counterpulsation, which were not medically necessary, US Attorney Paul Fishman for the District of New Jersey said.”
  • Florida’s Medical Marijuana Rules Upheld — “Florida Administrative Hearings Judge David Watkins rejected claims by an Orange County nursery that the state’s proposed rules and regulations were unfairly developed to give advantage to bigger, politically connected nurseries to win the five regional medical-marijuana-growing licenses the law allows. … Florida may now start creating a statewide medical-marijuana program that so far has only been proposed. The program, as written, allows five companies to grow low-THC marijuana, extract an oil and sell it as medicine for people who suffer from intractable epilepsy and several other debilitating conditions.”

CMS Leaves its Finger in the Dike by Extending its Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment

February 1, 2015 Leave a comment

On January 29, CMS announced last week that it would extend the “temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new ambulance suppliers and home health agencies (HHAs) in specific locations within designated metropolitan areas in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey to prevent and combat fraud, waste, and abuse.”  The Federal Register will publish this announcement on February 2, 2015.

The ACA allows the HHS Secretary to impose a temporary moratorium on the enrollment of new Medicare, Medicaid or CHIP providers and suppliers to prevent (or combat) fraud, abuse, or waste.  The moratorium is for six months and can be extended in 6-month increments.

The war on healthcare fraud is a lot like fighting roaches in Florida.  You can be very vigilant, keep a clean house, and use pesticide regularly, but there will always be roaches — bigger and stronger ones to replace the ones you kill.  Likewise, we spend lots of money and devote significant resources to fighting healthcare fraud, and no matter how many fraud mongers we put out of business, there are always more to take their places.

The dike has to many leaks.  One wonders how much more legitimate healthcare could be given if so much wasn’t siphoned off by bad guys, but is there a practical solution?

Charlotte’s Tangled Web — Florida’s New Law on Medical Marijuana

August 24, 2014 Leave a comment

 

Stetson

USF Health

I invite you to register for this timely and lively program, “Charlotte’s Tangled Web – Considerations for How Doctors and Lawyers Might Avoid the Legal Entanglements of Medical Marijuana in Florida.”

It is being sponsored by Stetson University College of Law and USF Health.  I will be one of the speakers.

Legal and medical continuing education credit has been applied for.

What Providers Need to Know Before They Balance Bill

August 16, 2014 1 comment

A very important topic that can get providers into hot water if they do not take the time to understand the requirements of their managed care contracts and Florida law.

Florida Healthcare Law Firm Blog

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By: Karina Gonzalez

Balance billing occurs when a provider collects from a patient the difference between the amount billed for a covered service and the amount  paid for that service.  Balance billing does not apply when collecting deductibles, copayments or coinsurance.

Under Florida law, a provider may not balance bill a patient for any service, if an HMO is liable and responsible for payment.  Contrary to what many people believe, this is true whether you are in-network or out-of-network.  Even hospital based out-of-network physicians, such as anesthesiologists, pathologists, radiologists or emergency room physicians cannot balance bill HMO members where the hospital has a contract with the HMO or there was authorization given for an episode of care.

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New OIG Special Fraud Alert Aimed at Laboratory Payments to Referring Physicians

July 13, 2014 Leave a comment

Two of  my partners, Michael Gennett and Elizabeth Hodge, and I authored the following post for Akerman’s Healthcare Blog:


 

On June 25, 2014, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued a Special Fraud Alert entitled “Laboratory Payments to Referring Physicians.” While the Alert breaks no new ground (see, e.g., its 1994 Special Fraud Alert), it demonstrates the OIG’s continuing concerns about clinical laboratories’ offering inducements to referring physicians.

The Alert provides an in-depth discussion of laboratories’ paying referring physicians for collecting specimens and paying physicians for submitting patient data to a registry or database. The Alert explains that physicians who prepare specimens for transfer from the office to a laboratory have a CPT code (99000) to bill Medicare for a nominal charge. Where laboratories are separately paying the same physician for specimen collection, the double billing is evidence to the OIG of an obvious intent to induce referrals. Similarly, with respect to physicians submitting patient data for a database, even if the project has legitimate underpinnings, it may still be illegal if an intent is to induce referral. The Alert contains a detailed list of characteristics of specimen processing and data registry arrangements that it finds suspect.

The OIG ‘s concerns are not lessened in referral arrangements that “carve out” Medicare and other federal programs and focus only on commercial insurance. The OIG takes the position that, because physicians refer to a limited number of labs, inducements with respect to commercial insurance are likely intended to induce Medicare referrals also. Equally important, inducements for commercial insurance referrals may violate applicable state laws (for example, Florida’s Patient Brokering law).

Physicians should review their financial arrangements with outside clinical labs. The question to be asked always is whether one of the reasons for the arrangement is to induce referrals of patients for lab services. Although the Alert focuses on specimen processing and data registry arrangements, that does not mean that other arrangements are OK. The fraud and abuse concerns set forth in the Alert extend to any arrangement that provides some sort of financial benefit to physicians with the intent to induce referrals of patients for lab services.

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Following publication of the Alert, the OIG published a study entitled “Questionable Billing for Medicare Part B Clinical Laboratory Services.” In the Study, the OIG found that “[a]lmost half of the labs that exceeded the thresholds for five or more measures of questionable billing—compared to 13 percent of all labs—were located in California and Florida, areas known to be vulnerable to Medicare fraud.” The OIG’s recommended that it “[r]eview the labs identified as having questionable billing and take appropriate action” and also “[r]eview existing program integrity strategies to determine whether these strategies are effectively identifying program vulnerabilities associated with lab services.” As a result, clinical labs and physicians should exercise great vigilance in reviewing their financial and referral relationships with each other to insure that they comply with applicable federal (and state) fraud and abuse and other healthcare laws.

Phoning It In – Florida’s Brand New Telemedicine Law

March 12, 2014 Leave a comment

Florida Healthcare Law Firm Blog

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Until recently, the State of Florida has successfully avoided regulating telemedicine to account for advancements in technology. In 2003, the State issued standards for telemedicine prescribing practice for medical doctors and doctors of osteopathy, but has not formally revisited its position in light of increasingly common telemedicine practice in several states – until now.

Florida’s forestalling has officially come to an end.  The State recently enacted new physician standards for telemedicine practice, and the State legislature is presently considering further regulation.  These new standards do not impinge upon the prior standards for telemedicine prescribing practice, but are issued in conjunction to it. 

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